"Very huge machine" is an interactive installation producing user-defined drawings. It deals with the question of in how far artificial intelligence might affect how machines around us will be built in the future.
Artificial intelligence does not only change WHAT machines do, but WHAT the machines are actually made of and how: the current process in building machines is deterministic and dominated by precision, repeatability and serial production. But when machines are able to learn what effects of their actions induce, the deterministic and precise approach to planning and building machines will become obsolete.
This thought resulted in a kit to build large drawing machines from roof battens and small kinematic elements that animate the whole structure.
There is no need for a plan or measurements in assembly - the machine parts are simply bolted to a wall or another substructure and then connected to each other via flexible joints and the motor-elements.
All technical elements rely heavily on ready-made, freely available parts. The motors consist of microcontrollers connected to stepper motors that drive along a specific roof batten rail on a timing belt that is simply stapled onto the rather soft wood.
By moving along their axes the motors animate the whole structure. At the "endpoint" of this moving structure a pen is attached. This position is then tracked with a camera.
The positions of the motors on their respective rail and the resulting position of the pen are fed into a deep neural network   backend running on a server which resolves the relationship between the movement of the motors and the pen.
After a learning phase, target coordinates can be entered and the position of the motors is put out.
Through an interface it is then possible to inputs paths and create drawings that are independent of the machine's construction.

Detailed documentation of the individual parts can be found here:
Motors
Interface
Backend
for testing purposes i built a "test bench" in the studio to test various software and hardware improvements
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